courthouse-clocktowerHere in New Hanover County, the community, elected officials and county staff cooperate to balance a high quality of life with a progressive business and economic climate.

At less than 200 square miles, New Hanover County is the second smallest – geographically – of the 100 North Carolina counties; however, it is home to more than 232,000 people.

New Hanover County is not just a great place in which to live or visit. New Hanover County is also a great place to do business. Tourism, film production, the service and retail sectors are the engines that power our economy.

Our Mission: New Hanover County is committed to progressive public policy, superior service, courteous contact, judicious exercise of authority, and sound fiscal management to meet the needs and concerns of our citizens today and tomorrow.

The government of New Hanover County is committed to ensuring that you are safe, healthy and secure; that is our promise to you.

New Hanover County Manager Chris Coudriet serves as chief administrator of county government and maintains responsibility for administering all departments under the general control of the five-member Board of Commissioners.

The county manager’s work includes the development of the county’s annual budget. The budget is the policy document, financial plan, and operations guide and communications device of county government. It reflects the county’s response to the needs of the community and residents’ requests for services. New Hanover County’s government operates on a $398 million multi-fund budget for the fiscal year that began July 1, 2019 and ends June 30, 2020, serving more than 233,000 residents.

In addition, the manager and his executive leadership team are responsible for aligning the operations of the county to the adopted strategic plan and advancing the county’s mission and vision through five key focus areas: superior education and workforce, superior public health and safety, intelligent growth and economic development, strong financial performance, and effective county management.

Mr. Coudriet has served as the county manager since July 2012. Prior to his appointment, he served as assistant county manager for New Hanover County for four years and as county manager in Franklin and Washington counties, N.C.

Mr. Coudriet has twenty-five years of public administration experience, with fifteen years as a county manager or assistant county manager in North Carolina. He has a Bachelor of Science Degree in Urban and Regional Planning from East Carolina University and a Master’s Degree in Public Administration from the University of North Carolina at Pembroke.

He is a native of eastern North Carolina. Chris and his wife, Leigh, and two children Montgomery and Silas, reside in Wilmington.

New Hanover County has received the final economic development target analysis report from Jay Garner titled Pathways to Prosperity: New Hanover County’s Plan for Jobs and Investment and it’s critical companion piece, the Competitive Realties Report.

Manager's Message

One Thousand, Five Hundred and Ten

Posted December 20, 2018 at 2:17 pm

By County Manager Chris Coudriet

One thousand, five hundred and ten. That’s the number of New Hanover County employees who stayed behind, served our community, and supported our residents for 21 straight days during Hurricane Florence and in the days that immediately followed.

Their acts of care and responsiveness were extraordinary, and I can never thank them enough.

I recently had the chance to talk with many of the employees who served during Florence. I met with them in their offices, departments and job sites and presented each employee with a lapel pin. I called them by name, thanked them for their service, and asked that they wear the lapel pin with pride.

For me, it is a small token of thanks and a symbol of their service to this county. And I wanted to make our community aware of this symbol, as well.

It is very likely that you will see a county employee around town – walking on the river walk, at the grocery store, or at a restaurant – wearing their lapel pin. If you do, I ask that you stop them and thank them.

These employees left their families to support and protect our residents during one of the most difficult times in our recent history. They deserve continuous thanks from all of us for all that they gave and all they did.

Our employees care about every single person in our county. They care about your lives, families, homes, and businesses. So, I hope you will join me in recognizing their work before, during and after Hurricane Florence.

In case you are wondering what the lapel pin looks like, take a peek at a few pictures of the lapel pin presentations in our recognition video.

As you celebrate the holidays and spend time with family and friends, I hope you will take time to reflect on the incredible work of our New Hanover County employees, as well as everyone who selflessly served our community during this difficult time. Many are still serving today, and I, for one, am grateful for these heroes among us.


For These Things and More, I Am Thankful

Posted November 20, 2018 at 8:25 am

By County Manager Chris Coudriet Thankful. It’s a word most of us use around this time of year but it feels incredibly fitting for me to use it now as … Read More »


Resiliency is Key to Economic Recovery After Florence

Posted October 19, 2018 at 1:56 pm

By County Manager Chris Coudriet New Hanover County experienced significant impacts from Hurricane Florence. The preliminary damage assessment across the county is more than $450 million in real and personal … Read More »


Lessons Learned from a False Alarm

Posted August 16, 2018 at 3:35 pm

By County Manager Chris Coudriet You may have heard about New Hanover County Government Center’s inadvertent emergency alert that happened on Aug. 1. The alert was treated as a real … Read More »


Increasing Recycling, Reuse and Waste Reduction

Posted July 18, 2018 at 3:58 pm

By County Manager Chris Coudriet If you want to see innovation at work, take a tour around the New Hanover County landfill. You won’t just see a pile of trash; … Read More »